Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621728
Title:
Generation of immunoliposomes using microfluidic devices
Authors:
Lawrence, Meaghan
Abstract:
Immunoliposomes, or antibody-conjugated liposomes, hold promise as an effective way to target drugs to specific tissues. Currently, we can find in the market immunoliposomes such as Doxil, an anti-cancer drug; Amphotec, an anti-fungal drug; and Allovectin-7, used for gene therapy. However the synthesis methods used areinefficient. The formation of liposomes is a multi-step process that requires sonication and filtering. In addition, its encapsulation efficiency is low, what leads to the waste, in many cases, of expensive drugs. We use microfluidic technology to solve these obstacles to efficient liposomal synthesis. We generated double emulsion drops (a drop inside another drop) where the inner liquid is the drug we want to encapsulate, the middle phase is a solution of lipids and the outer is an aqueous solution where our liposome will be dispersedand the conjugation with the anti-bodies will happen. The advantage of this method is its high encapsulating efficiency and the control of the size of the liposome. This techniquecouldpotentiallybe used to drastically reduce side effects and increase tissue-specific drug targeting for a wide variety of diseases.
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry and Physics
Issue Date:
12-Feb-2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621728
Submitted date:
26-JAN-2018 06:31AM
Type:
Oral Presentation
Description:
Presentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conference
Appears in Collections:
19th Annual PKP Student Research and Fine Arts Conference: Oral Symposia V

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Meaghanen
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-12T17:19:35Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-12T17:19:35Z-
dc.date.issued2018-02-12-
dc.date.submitted26-JAN-2018 06:31AM-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10675.2/621728-
dc.descriptionPresentation given at the 19th Annual Phi Kappa Phi Student Research and Fine Arts Conferenceen
dc.description.abstractImmunoliposomes, or antibody-conjugated liposomes, hold promise as an effective way to target drugs to specific tissues. Currently, we can find in the market immunoliposomes such as Doxil, an anti-cancer drug; Amphotec, an anti-fungal drug; and Allovectin-7, used for gene therapy. However the synthesis methods used areinefficient. The formation of liposomes is a multi-step process that requires sonication and filtering. In addition, its encapsulation efficiency is low, what leads to the waste, in many cases, of expensive drugs. We use microfluidic technology to solve these obstacles to efficient liposomal synthesis. We generated double emulsion drops (a drop inside another drop) where the inner liquid is the drug we want to encapsulate, the middle phase is a solution of lipids and the outer is an aqueous solution where our liposome will be dispersedand the conjugation with the anti-bodies will happen. The advantage of this method is its high encapsulating efficiency and the control of the size of the liposome. This techniquecouldpotentiallybe used to drastically reduce side effects and increase tissue-specific drug targeting for a wide variety of diseases.en
dc.subjectmicrofluidicsen
dc.subjectdouble emulsionen
dc.subjectimmunoliposomeen
dc.titleGeneration of immunoliposomes using microfluidic devicesen
dc.typeOral Presentationen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Chemistry and Physicsen
cr.funding.sourceSupported in part by the Augusta University Provost's office, and the Translational Research Program of the Department of Medicine, Medical College of Georgia at Augusta Universityen
dc.contributor.sponsorGuerrero-Millan, Josefaen
dc.contributor.sponsorDepartment of Chemistry and Physicsen
dc.contributor.affiliationAugusta Universityen
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